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KelizC.art

Fine Art Paintings

Copyright 2018-2024 Karen Conger. KelizC.art. All Rights Reserved.

Karen Conger, Artist

Promoting social change as an artist to develop social awareness and support for endangered wildlife.

Omnivore

The definition is determined by an animal's diet.

 

The word 'omnivore' is derived from Latin words:

  • Omni, meaning "all or everything"

  • Vorare, meaning "to devour or eat"

An omnivore is an organism that eats plants and animals. The term stems from the Latin words omnis, meaning “all or everything,” and vorare, meaning “to devour or eat.”

https://education.nationalgeographic.org/resource/omnivores/

African Elephant - Morning Call (Soft Pastel, Colored Pencil) kelizc.art
Giant Panda Panache (Soft Pastel, Colored Pencil, Ink) kelizc.art
Pygmy Raccoon - Tiny Carnivore (Soft Pastel) kelizc.art
Polar Bear - Snow Warm (Soft Pastel) kelizc.art
Arctic Fox - Whiteout (Soft Pastel) kelizc.art

All omnivore paintings are on this page. Click on each image or scroll down to see larger images of the paintings and to read interesting facts about each animal and the conservations efforts that are currently underway.

 

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© 2018-2024 by Karen Conger. KelizC.art. All rights reserved.

Herd of Elephants

African Elephant – Morning Call

(Soft Pastel, Colored Pencil)

kelizc.art - Copyright © 2018-2024 Karen Conger, Artist. All rights reserved.
kelizc.art - Copyright © 2018-2024 Karen Conger, Artist. All rights reserved.

African Elephant – Morning Call

(Soft Pastel, Colored Pencil)

Are elephants omnivores or herbivores? Research shows that elephant diets are largely 95% plant matter, but they will eat some animal matter. According to 'thingsinelphant.com', "the reason why elephants are considered to be omnivores is because they are able to digest both plant and animal matter. Elephants have a four-chambered stomach that ferments food, allowing them to extract nutrients from both plant and animal material." (https://thingsinelephant.com)

Family groups that over the years have been torn apart by an epidemic of poaching across Africa is fueled by a growing demand for ivory. Tens of thousands of African elephants continue to be killed each year for their tusks.

 

 

There are three species of elephants - African savannah (or bush), African forest, and Asian. The Asian elephants have smaller ears than the African elephants.

 

The IUCN "Red List of Threatened Species" classifies the African elephant as Endangered (Decreasing).

 

Reference photo for this artwork is from pixabay.com.

 

Information about African elephants can be found on the official websites of Wildlife Conservation Network (WCN), WildAid, Nature Conservancy, World Wildlife Fund (WWF), Elephants for Africa, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

 

Copyright © 2023 Karen Conger All Rights Reserved.

Image by Kinsey W

Giant Panda Panache

(Soft Pastel, Colored Pencil, Ink)

kelizc.art - Copyright © 2018-2024 Karen Conger, Artist. All rights reserved.
kelizc.art - Copyright © 2018-2024 Karen Conger, Artist. All rights reserved.

Giant Panda Panache

(Soft Pastel, Colored Pencil, Ink)

Wild pandas live only in remote, mountainous regions in central China. They are found in dense bamboo and coniferous forests at altitudes of 5,000 to 10,000 feet.

 

Driven nearly to extinction by habitat loss and poaching, these individuals are among the rarest in the world, with only an estimated 1,800 remaining in the wild. Low reproductive rates make them more vulnerable to threats and extinction.

 

Improved conservation efforts and better survey methods show an increase in the wild panda population.

 

Hundreds more pandas live in breeding centers and zoos, where they are always among the most popular attractions. Much of what we know about pandas comes from studying these zoo animals, because their wild cousins are so rare and elusive.

 

The IUCN "Red List of Threatened Species" lists the giant panda as Vulnerable (Increasing).

 

Reference photo for this artwork is from pixabay.com.

 

Information about the giant panda can be found on the official websites of National Geographic, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

 

Copyright © 2023 Karen Conger All Rights Reserved.

Image by Devin H

Pygmy Raccoon - Tiny Carnivore

(Soft Pastel)

These small masked raccoons with the big black eyes are tiny carnivores with adult males weighing less than four kilograms. The IUCN lists this species of raccoon (procyon pygmaeus) as critically endangered, with a declining population of fewer than 200 individuals in 2016.

 

The pygmy raccoon faces four main challenges to survival:

• They live only on one part of one small island in Central America and thus have only limited habitat.

• There is no escape for them from the impacts of habitat loss to human development for the tourism industry and sea level rise due to climate change.

• They are susceptible to diseases brought there by invasive species.

• They fall prey to non-native predators, from domestic cats to boa constrictors.

 

The pygmy raccoon is officially protected, but there isn't much outside of that label being done to help them, including laws protecting them.

 

Ideas for conservation have included preserving the mangrove and semi-evergreen forests in which the pygmy raccoons live, halting development in the area and making it off-limits to any new development. Captive breeding is also a possibility, if there are conservation zoos willing to take on the expense. And of course, removing non-native disease-carrying predators like feral cats would be a huge benefit to the species.

 

The IUCN "Red List of Threatened Species" classifies the Pygmy Raccoon as Critical (Decreasing).

 

Reference photo for this artwork is licensed royalty-free from Shutterstock.

 

Information about Pygmy Raccoons can be found on the official websites of animaldiversity.org; treehugger.com; and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

 

Copyright © 2023 Karen Conger All Rights Reserved.

kelizc.art - Copyright © 2018-2024 Karen Conger, Artist. All rights reserved.
kelizc.art - Copyright © 2018-2024 Karen Conger, Artist. All rights reserved.

Pygmy Raccoon - Tiny Carnivore

(Soft Pastel)

Pygmy Raccoon - Tiny Carnivore

(Soft Pastel)

Image by Annie Spratt

Polar Bear Trio – Snow Warm

(Soft Pastel)

The largest bear in the world and the Arctic's top predator, polar bears are a powerful symbol of the strength and endurance of the Arctic. The polar bear's Latin name, Ursus maritimus, means "sea bear." It's an apt name for this majestic species, which spends much of its life in, around, or on the ocean–predominantly on the sea ice. In the United States, Alaska is home to two polar bear subpopulations.

 

Considered talented swimmers, polar bears can sustain a pace of six miles per hour by paddling with their front paws and holding their hind legs flat like a rudder. They have a thick layer of body fat and a water-repellent coat that insulates them from the cold air and water.

 

Polar bears spend over 50% of their time hunting for food. A polar bear might catch only one or two out of 10 seals it hunts, depending on the time of year and other variables. Their diet mainly consists of ringed and bearded seals because they need large amounts of fat to survive.

 

Fun Facts: 40kph:

  • The polar bear's top speed.

  • 42 razor sharp teeth: With jagged back teeth and canines larger than grizzly teeth, they pack quite the bite.

  • 30 cm wide paws: The size of a dinner plate! A natural snowshoe that helps the bear trek across treacherous ice and deep snow.

  • 3 eyelids: The third helps protect the bear's eyes from the elements.

  • 4 inches of fat: Under the bear's skin to keep it warm.

  • Black skin.

  • Transparent fur.

  • Blue tongue.

 

Are Polar Bears Endangered? The IUCN Polar Bear Specialist Group lists the polar bear as a vulnerable species (population n/a), citing sea ice loss from climate change as the single biggest threat to their survival. The most recent study cited on IUCN estimates there are currently about 23,000 polar bears worldwide.

 

Reference photo for this artwork is licensed royalty-free from Shutterstock.

 

Information about the polar bear can be found on the websites of World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), Polar Bears International, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

 

Copyright © 2023 Karen Conger All Rights Reserved.

kelizc.art - Copyright © 2018-2024 Karen Conger, Artist. All rights reserved.
kelizc.art - Copyright © 2018-2024 Karen Conger, Artist. All rights reserved.

Polar Bear Trio – Snow Warm

(Soft Pastel)

Image by Jonatan Pie

Arctic Fox – Whiteout

(Soft Pastel)

kelizc.art - Copyright © 2018-2024 Karen Conger, Artist. All rights reserved.
kelizc.art - Copyright © 2018-2024 Karen Conger, Artist. All rights reserved.

Arctic Fox – Whiteout

(Soft Pastel)

His tail is wrapped around him – very dim in the snow.

 

The Arctic fox can survive frigid Arctic temperatures as low as -58 degrees F in the treeless lands where it makes its home. Its furry soles, short ears, and short muzzle also help it adapt to the cold climate. The fox's thick tail aids its balance and is especially useful as warm cover in cold weather. In a blizzard, it may tunnel into the snow to seek shelter.

 

It has a beautiful white (sometimes blue-gray) coat that acts as very effective winter camouflage, allowing the animal to blend into the tundra's snow and ice. When the seasons change, the coat turns brown or gray offering cover among the summer tundra's rock and plants.

 

In winter, prey can be very scarce on the ground and arctic foxes will follow the region's premier predator - a polar bear - to eat leftover scraps from its kills. Foxes will also eat vegetables when they are available.

 

UN.Habitat.org categorizes the Arctic Fox as critically endangered.

 

The IUCN "Red List of Threatened Species" considers them as of Least Concern (Stable). An action plan has been developed for Arctic Foxes in Sweden (Elmhagen 2008) and status reports have been published for Norway (Ulvund et al. 2013) and Finland (Kaikusalo et al. 2000). In Sweden, Norway and Finland, a conservation project led to significant increases in the population (Angerbjörn et al. 2013).

 

Reference photo for this artwork is licensed royalty-free from Shutterstock.

 

Information about the Arctic fox can be found on the official websites of National Geographic, un-habitat.org, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

 

Copyright © 2023 Karen Conger All Rights Reserved.

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